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SUNY Geneseo Fraser Hall Library Subject Guides


FMST 100 Intro to Film Studies -- Professor Okada: November 9, 2017 Library Session

Assignment

     

Citation Tracking

"Picturizing Race: Hollywood's Censorship of Miscegenation and Production of Racial Visibility through Imitation of Life"

Open Google Scholar in a new window. Copy and paste the name of these articles into Google Scholar. When the article listing appears, look for the words, "Cited by..." and click on it. This is a list of other articles that cite the first one, some of which may be on the same topic.

 

1. Screenwriting Strategies in Marguerite Duras's Script for Hiroshima, Mon Amour

2. Speak, Trauma: Toward a Revised Understanding of Literary Trauma Theory

3. Desire at Cross(-Cultural) Purposes: Hiroshima, mon amour and Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence

4. From Shoah to Holocaust: Image and Ideology in Alain Resnais's Nuit et brouillard and Hiroshima mon amour

5. Representation and Absence: Paradoxical Structure in Postmodern Texts

6. The Predication of Violence, the Violence of Predication: Reconstructing Hiroshima with Duras and Resnais

7. Vision Denied in Night and Fog and Hiroshima mon amour

8. Hiroshima, mon amour: From Iconography to Rhetoric

9. When Whiteness Feminizes …: Some Consequences of a Supplementary Logic

10. Hiroshima, mon amour, Time, and Proust

11. 'Documenting' the National Past in French Film

12. Imitation of Life in a Segregated Atlanta: Its Promotion, Distribution and Reception

13. Divided Images: Black Female Spectatorship and John Stahl's Imitation of Life

14. Racial Etiquette and the (White) Plot of Passing: (Re)Inscribing 'Place' in John Stahl's Imitation of Life

15. Is Art Imitating Life? Communicating Gender and Racial Identity in Imitation of Life

16. Let It Pass: Changing the Subject, Once Again