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SUNY Geneseo Fraser Hall Library Subject Guides


HIST 413 Black Power and Structural Inequality in Post WWII US -- Professor Crosby: Library Session, April 25, 2019 Citing sources

Turabian and CMS

       
Chicago Manual of Style (OWL) 
Chicago Manual of Style Online
Turabian Quick Guide

Example Bibliography
Example Endnotes
Example Footnotes
Practice Inserting footnotes

NOTE: In the Chicago/Turabian style, there are actually 2 methods of citing. One is called Bibliography/Note style,  covered in Chapters 16 and 17 of the Turabian manual, starting on page 144. The other is called the Author-Date style, covered in Chapters 18 and 19 of the Turabian manual. Dr. Crosby wants you to use the Bibliography/Notes method. BE CAREFUL about which examples you follow in the manual or online.

Some notes about URLs and links in citations

The newest editions of the Chicago and Turabian manuals state that URLs and DOIs are optional if you are citing a published source, like an article from a journal, newspaper or magazine, that you saw online. So it is really up to the professor for whom you are writing a paper. In general:

  • Professor Crosby absolutely requires the title of the article, the author, the name of the journal, newspaper, or magazine, the date, volume, issue (if available), and page numbers. She does not require the URL or DOI for an article from a journal, newspaper, or magazine, but if you do put one in your citation, it must work properly. (NOTE: If you got the link from a research database and put it in your bibliography or footnote, it will most likely not work the next day. That is because the database is trying to protect its property and make sure that only people who have a subscription have access to the article. So, if you put the URL in your research paper, your professor will not be able to open the direct link to the article. DO NOT PUT A NON-WORKING LINK IN A CITATION.)

  • Professor Crosby absolutely requires that if you are citing a web page that is NOT a journal, newspaper, or magazine article, ALWAYS include a working URL as well as the name of the web page, the organization that sponsored it, and the date you accessed it. CHECK YOUR LINKS. Make sure they work. 
     
  • Professor Crosby sometimes gives you articles in Google Drive, which you might want to use in a research paper. DO NOT PUT THE LINK TO GOOGLE DRIVE IN YOUR CITATION. Cite the article by giving the title of the article, the author, the name of the journal, newspaper, or magazine, the date, volume, issue (if available), and page numbers. If those things are not immediately evident, do a little research. Look the title and author up in a few databases, or Google it, to find the missing citation information. As a last resort, ask Professor Crosby for the information.

Citing Sources -- Turabian Footnotes and Bibliography Entries

Citing an essay, chapter, or other part of a book:

Citing a part of a book that was previously published elsewhere (as primary sources often are):

If you use more than one primary source from the same edited volume, your footnote should identify the primary source, but you may list the book only once in your bibliography, like this:

 

Citing a journal article you got as a PDF, from a database or via interlibrary loan:

 

Citing a journal article you got as a PDF, from a database or via interlibrary loan, with a DOI:

 

Citing a newspaper article you saw online:

 

 

Citing an unsigned essay or text from a webpage:

Citing a signed essay or text from a webpage:

     

  Citing a web page with scanned image of a document from an archive:

 

Citing a web page with a scanned image of an unpublished letter from an archive:

        

Citing a web page with an interview:

 *** If you do not have a date for the interview, or the name of the interviewer, simply leave them out. Likewise, if there is no "title" to the interview (i.e. “Texan Environmental Activist Diane Wilson: Why I Refuse to go Jail”) just put the word Interview after the name of the person being interviewed.

 

Citing a TV program that you saw on YouTube:

 

 

Citing a podcast that you accessed online: